3 tips for better teacher-student communication

While there are many skilled Mixed Martial Arts experts out there, the notion that any of them can teach is simply false. It takes a lot of preparation and know-how to lead a group of students through the basic tenets of MMA and get them to enjoy their training time.

Being a strong instructor requires more than simply being an MMA expert. There are many lessons aspiring teachers have to learn before being in front of a collection of eager trainees. Below are some simple tips that MMA instructors can take into the gym on day one and demonstrate to their class that each student will be getting a first-rate experience:

Don't forget about eye contact
Whether it is addressing the entire class or just one student, it's important to always show confidence by holding eye contact. According to Entrepreneur magazine, maintaining eye contact with members of the class is a nonverbal cue that can lead to being a better communicator. When students lock eyes with their teacher, they will be more engaged in their learning and will have a higher level of respect for their leader. Instructors who look at the ground or off into the distance when giving directions will find that they may be losing their students' attention.

Change up voice fluctuation
Being able to control a room stretches past simply having a knowledge of MMA training practices. Instructors have to be able to hold the attention of their students for the entire duration of the class. When addressing their students, it's important for teachers to vary their vocal patterns. Not only will this make it easier for students to listen to what leaders are saying, but having a boring, monotonous tone can simply lull some people to sleep while in the training gym. 

Be demonstrative
Some students find it easier to learn when they see a demonstration instead of only listening to instruction. Teachers should keep this in mind, and as part of their class they should provide examples of certain MMA techniques to their students. Showing students how to execute a move or a technique can be more more effective than explaining it to them. Even when lecturing on technique, teachers should mix up their hand gestures to keep everyone in the room engaged with what they are saying.