Work on creating a consistent martial arts school

Any small-business owner would be lucky to have his or her resume read like Peyton Manning's. He stands out at the quarterback position and is the model of consistency. This is the main lesson martial arts school owners can take from Manning. Just like his teammates count on him to lead each and every game day, instructors look to their bosses for how to better orchestrate their classes.

In a recent article for Fox Business, Rohit Arora, CEO of Biz2Credit, wrote that it's possible to make an argument that there has never been a more consistent player than Manning. It's hard to go against his point as Manning's career statistics speak for themselves. He is someone that martial arts school owners should model themselves after. By holding himself to a high standard, it forces his teammates to do the same. To have the best school possible, owners not only have to have high expectations for themselves, but also for their entire workforce.

Consistency is critical to success
Students are going to want to return to martial arts classes when they know what they will get out of their experience. They will be less likely to do so if they aren't sure it will be worth their money. However, this is something that several small-business owners don't think about very much. Many are more interested in using the latest technology, playing around on social media and dressing up their companies. Focusing on having a high-quality operation often gets overlooked, which can bring down martial arts schools.

"The importance of consistency in business seems so basic as to not need discussion," according to a Moneywatch article. "Yet many companies – especially smaller ones – operate in a day-by-day, case-by-case fashion that is disorganized, undisciplined and certainly inefficient."

Martial arts school owners need to think about their classes as their product. Just like companies don't want to give each customer a different experience every time they interact with them, school owners should take pride in delivering the same consistent interactions with all of their students. This is the best way to boost the school's reputation, as it is well-documented that today's consumers are quite willing to log on to their social platforms to talk about their positive experiences with businesses.

Stay away from hurting the school
While consistency is key, no martial arts school is perfect. There are going to be things that the business will struggle with as time goes on. Recognizing these problems and learning from them can help martial arts school owners prepare their companies for long-term success. Here is a list from Fox Business of some common errors that owners of martial arts school should keep in mind when evaluating their operations:

  • Ignoring past customers: It's important to always try to bring in new customers, but companies cannot forget about those who have been loyal in the past. Having a strategy to retain business is something that all successful businesses will do.
  • Not thinking about the future: While the outlook for the company may look bright now, small-company owners should continue to plan down the road. It's critical to always have a plan for the future of the business. This will give all members of the enterprise something to strive for and continue to work hard to achieve.
  • Failing to provide training: All businesses have a certain way of doing things, and having every employee on board is key. By creating a program to get new staff up to speed and providing professional development opportunities for current workers, company owners should have a workforce with strong skill sets.